background image
15th December 2019 
About Psychotherapy. Image4

My training is in integrative and humanistic psychotherapy. I realise that is a bit of a mouthful so I have broken it down below so as to give you a sense of how this may be experienced in the therapy room.


Integrative

On the psychotherapy spectrum, there is a range of approaches. From the more analytical and directive, which tend to focus on childhood experiences and how these have impacted the way we experience ourselves today to that which allows the client to take control of the sessions with minimal interventions from the therapist. Where I sit on this spectrum will vary not only on the person who is sat in front of me but also what I feel the person needs in the moment. Thus even with the same client, my approach will evolve as our relationship evolves. In this respect, I may be said to adhere to an approach that integrates all psychotherapeutic approaches.


Humanistic

Central to the humanistic approach is the idea that each person has the potential within himself to drive change. The role of the therapist therefore is to create an environment that will precipitate this change. In practice, this means that I try to be with each client in an authentic, inquiring way. I believe that there are many different aspects of each of us and as I am with a client I will try and remain aware of how each aspect impacts on me whilst also keeping sight of the person as a whole.


Psychotherapy

Most people may know about counselling but may be less familiar with Psychotherapy. Both may use the same approaches and techniques and this aspect is more dependent on the therapist. The main difference is that counselling usually focuses on one or two specific issues and is usually shorter term. Psychotherapy on the other hand is a more open-ended process. A client may initially be brought to psychotherapy because of some issue in his life but in time this may open up into a deeper, more holistic exploration of themselves. During the work, a client may become conscious of reoccurring behavioural patterns that continue to emerge and which may effect the way they live and the nature of their relationships. They may also gain a better understanding of the origins of such patterns and become more familiar with how they have come to be the person they are today.


About Psychotherapy. UKCP